FRED Watch Episode 11: This Island Earth (1955)

ALL-AMERICAN SCI-FI.

Universal International

Ashley, Phillip, and Wayne let their curiosity get the better of them and watch the B-grade sci-fi This Island Earth. Phillip and Wayne see the film’s potential, while Ash delivers the most conflicted FRED Watch review ever… Wait for his rant!

Listen to their review here:

 

Watch the trailer:

 

Not seen the film before? You can watch it here for free:

Starring: Jeff Morrow, Faith Domergue, Rex Reason, Lance Fuller, Russell Johnson, Douglas Spencer, Robert Nichols.

Directors: Joseph M. Newman, Jack Arnold | Producer: William Alland | Writers: Franklin Coen, Edward G. O’Callaghan (based on the novel This Island Earth novel by Raymond F. Jones) | Music: Henry Mancini [uncredited], Hans J. Salter [uncredited], Herman Stein [uncredited] | Cinematographer: Clifford Stine | Editor: Virgil Vogel

Available: DVD, Blu-ray, and YouTube

 

Let us know what you thought of this film in the comments!

 

You’ve just experienced FRED Watch.

 

RELATED PODCAST: FRED Watch Episode 1: Mystery Science Theater 3000 – The Movie (1996) ⬇️

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UNI-Bums: With Benefits

Nothing suss going on here as Sydney (Michael R. Lister) tries to execute the perfect social security rort with Jenny (Bethany Griffiths) and Bucket Head (Phillip Hunting) playing along with the scheme, whether they like it or not!

Check out the 2018 limited season premiere of UNI-Bums ⬇️

 

Starring: Michael R. Lister, Bethany Griffiths, Phillip Hunting, Ben Campbell, Fulya Kantarmaci, Ash Hall.

Director: Bethany Griffiths | Writer: Michael R. Lister | Producers [uncredited]: Bethany Griffiths, Phillip Hunting, Fulya Kantarmaci, Michael R. Lister, Wayne Stellini | Cinematographer/Editor: Fulya Kantarmaci

 

What did you think of the Bums’ scheme? Let us know in the comments!

 

RELATED VIDEO: UNI-Bums: House Inspection ⬇️

A Podcast Called FRED #43

Still on Cloud Nine after an intimate show with comedy act Tripod, Kendall and Fulya deliver the latest in pop culture and entertainment news in the podcast that refuses to behave—it’s A Podcast Called FRED!

Nerdy News includes:

  • Loki television series gets the green light;
  • AMC plans Rick Grimes Walking Dead trilogy;
  • Breaking Bad film in the works;
  • and more!

Trailer Park discussions:

Quickie Review:

  • Suspiria

Popcorn Culture:

  • This week, the team discuss which gaming universe they would like to live in—including responses from you!

Check out A Podcast Called FRED #43 ⬇️

 

Remember to let us know your response to the Popcorn Culture question so you can be featured in next week’s episode of A Podcast Called FRED!

 

PREVIOUS EPISODE: A Podcast Called FRED #42 ⬇️

 

Incompetent Gamers: Rocket League—Live Stream 6

 

DarthPudden and Sharpy take incompetent gaming to a whole new level as they get up early to play Rocket League as well as Payday 2 and Plague Inc.

Streamed live on YouTube, check it out ⬇️

Subscribe to YouTube.com/FTAchannel to be notified of and involved with the next live stream of Incompetent Gamers.

 

PREVIOUS EPISODE: Incompetent Gamers: Rocket League—Live Stream 5 ⬇️

Incompetent Gamers: Spy Fox 2 — FulishFuji Is a Big Kid!

Incompetent gamer FulishFuji refuses to grow up, revisiting Spy Fox 2: Some Assembly Required!

Streamed live on YouTube, check it out ⬇️

Subscribe to YouTube.com/FTAchannel to be notified of and involved with the next live stream of Incompetent Gamers.

 

RELATED VIDEO: Spy Fox in “Dry Cereal” — FulishFuji Takeover ⬇️

FRED Watch Quickie Film Review: Legally Blonde (2001)

PRETTY IN PINK.

I’m a Wayne Stellini and welcome to FRED Watch, where we review everything from the mainstream to the obscure. Today’s film is Legally Blonde

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

Blonde, busty, and beautiful fashion merchandising student Elle Woods (Reece Witherspoon) is heartbroken when elitist boyfriend Warner Huntington III (Matthew Davis) dumps her because his political future needs to entail a Jackie and not a Marilyn.

Determined to win Warner back, Elle follows in his academic footsteps and attends Harvard Law School. Dismissed by most of the faculty and her classmates, including Warner, Elle uses her unique personal experiences and perspectives to excel and is given the opportunity to prove herself when she interns on a high-profile murder case…

Revisiting Legally Blonde, it isn’t difficult to see why Robert Luketic’s entertaining comedy was such a huge box office hit upon release. Nor it is surprising to see why it has remained a fixture in popular culture, most notably introducing audiences to the ‘bend and snap’ pick-up method.

The success of the film rests squarely on our leading lady’s shoulders. Oozing more charm than you would think is humanly possible, Witherspoon makes what could easily be read as an incredibly narcissistic and materialistic figure into an endearing persona. There is absolutely nothing to dislike about Elle, whose heart radiates good intentions and loyalty. As a fish out of water in Harvard, she simply wants to be accepted, and it is at this point of the narrative—having continually being dismissed as a bimbo—that we as an audience are on her side. And once we are there, we are with her until the very end.

Legally Blonde is also cleverly written, having fun with the two-dimensional, stereotypical characters to such an extent that we really don’t mind and yet still care about them. The film does not pretend to break new ground, but what is presented feels fun and fresh, even after multiple viewings; that in itself is a remarkable accomplishment, and one that is a testament to the partnership of Luketic and Witherspoon.

Pour some pink champagne and raise your glass to ‘Woods comma Elle’, this one is a winner. 4½ / 5

Starring: Reese Witherspoon, Luke Wilson, Selma Blair, Matthew Davis, Victor Garber, Jennifer Coolidge, Holland Taylor.

Director: Robert Luketic | Producers: Marc Platt, Ric Kidney | Writers: Karen McCullah Lutz, Kirsten Smith (Based on Legally Blonde by Amanda Brown) | Music: Rolfe Kent | Cinematographer: Anthony B. Richmond | Editor: Anita Brandt-Burgoyne

Available: Netflix

Let us know what you thought of this film in the comments!

I’ve been a Wayne Stellini and you’ve just experienced FRED Watch.

A Podcast Called FRED #42

With Kendall away, Phillip and Wayne deliver the latest in pop culture and entertainment news in the podcast that refuses to behave—it’s A Podcast Called FRED!

Nerdy News includes:

  • Ridley Scott is moving forward with a sequel to Gladiator (2000) without Russell Crowe;
  • Ewan McGregor has signed on to appear in DC’s Birds of Prey as Black Mask;
  • Naomi Watts to star in a Game of Thrones prequel;
  • and more!

Trailer Park discussions:

Quickie Review:

  • Beautiful Boy

Popcorn Culture:

  • This week, the team discuss which horror movies they would show someone to introduce them to the genre—including responses from you!

Check out A Podcast Called FRED #42 ⬇️

Remember to let us know your response to the Popcorn Culture question so you can be featured in next week’s episode of A Podcast Called FRED!

Related:

 

PREVIOUS EPISODE: A Podcast Called FRED #41 ⬇️

 

Incompetent Gamers: Plague Inc: Evolved—Bit of a Sore Throat

Join incompetent gamers DarthPudden and Sharpy as they work together to infect the world, beginning with Madagascar!

Streamed live on YouTube, check out Incompetent Gamers: Plague Inc: Evolved—Bit of a Sore Throat ⬇️

Subscribe to YouTube.com/FTAchannel to be notified of and involved in the next live stream of Incompetent Gamers.

 

PREVIOUS EPISODE: Incompetent Gamers—Pud’s Still No Good ⬇️

Non-Scripted Ramblings #27

Join pop culture queen and mega Michael Jackson fan Kendall Richardson as she gives her thoughts on one of the King of Pop’s most overlooked and underrated gems, the short film Michael Jackson’s Ghosts!
 
Check out Non-Scripted Ramblings #27: Michael Jackson’s Ghosts ⬇️

Have you seen Michael Jackson’s Ghosts? Let us know your thoughts in the comments!

 

RELATED VIDEO: Collectible Chaos: Top Ten Favourite Michael Jackson Short Films ⬇️

FRED Watch Quickie Review: Assault on Precinct 13 (1976)

JOHN CARPENTER’S EPIC ASSAULT!

I’m a Wayne Stellini and welcome to FRED Watch, where we review everything from the mainstream to the obscure. Today’s film is John Carpenter’s cult classic exploitation flick Assault on Precinct 13

The CKK Corporation / Turtle Releasing Organization

Left in charge of Precinct 9 in Division 13 on its last day of operation, Lt. Ethan Bishop (Austin Stoker) finds himself, as well as colleagues, prisoners, and a civilian, the target of an armed street gang.

Unprepared for the onslaught, Bishop holds out for a rescue while trying to keep the bandits at bay…

Having made Dark Star two years earlier and taking inspiration from Howard Hawks’s Rio Bravo (1959), John Carpenter begins his immortalisation in genre cinema with Assault on Precinct 13. (This honour would be solidified when Carpenter redefined horror movies with Halloween in 1978.)

Frank Doubleday as White Warlord in the film’s most controversial scene. (Image: The CKK Corporation / Turtle Releasing Organization)

A bloody, no-holds-barred, and excessively violent exercise, Assault on Precinct 13‘s first act takes its time, running three stories simultaneously without any apparent strong connection. It isn’t until we reach about the half-way mark that these seemingly disjointed perspectives come crashing together and the film goes into overdrive—the bullets fly, and how!

It becomes evident quite quickly that Carpenter is less concerned with the characters as people or their backstories, but more so with how their personality traits contribute to the end goal of everyone involved. And why shouldn’t he be? For the most part, we know as much about them as they know about one another. The focus of the story is survival, where unlikely allies work together to overcome a shared threat.

In this case, that threat is in the form of a ruthless gang controlled by four warlords who are identified in terms of their respective ethnicities. To intensify the impact of their maniacal presence, these men and their thugs are depicted as nothing more than killing machines, particularly Frank Doubleday‘s White Warlord, who is involved in the film’s most shocking and (still) controversial scene. (No spoilers here, folks, but you’ll know it when you see it.)

As for the captives held up in the defunct precinct, Austin Stoker is in fine form as Bishop, whose leadership and rational thinking is displayed in the most erratic of circumstances. Two prisoners are by his side: death row inmate Napoleon Wilson (the charming Darwin Joston) and Wells (the always reliable Tony Burton), as well as precinct secretary Leigh (Laurie Zimmer). Additional characters are given less screen time, but each serves their purpose for the story perfectly. The film is also photographed and cut together rather stylishly.

Do not be mistaken, Carpenter never aimed to present a thought-provoking commentary on gang violence or the crumbling of society’s moral code. He did, however, strive to make an intense and entertaining action thriller that proves no one is beyond redemption. And Carpenter achieves this with flying colours. 4 / 5

 

Starring: Austin Stoker, Darwin Joston, Laurie Zimmer, Martin West, Tony Burton, Charles Cyphers, Nancy Loomis, Henry Brandon, Kim Richards, Peter Bruni, John J. Fox, Peter Frankland, Frank Doubleday, Gilbert De la Pena, Al Nakauchi, James Johnson, Marc Ross, Alan Koss.

Director/Writer/Music/Editor: John Carpenter | Producer: J. S. Kaplan | Cinematographer: Douglas Knapp

Available: Blu-ray

Let us know what you thought of this film in the comments!

 

I’ve been a Wayne Stellini and you’ve just experienced FRED Watch.